Little Women – Review

Fresh off the critical and commercial success of Lady Bird, and a clutch of major film awards, writer-director-actress Greta Gerwig had the pick of the bunch when selecting a new project. As it happened, a new adaptation of LM Alcott’s 1868 novel Little Women which she had authored for Sony Pictures was in need of... Continue Reading →

And Then We Danced – Lost in music (LFF Review)

Merab (Levan Gelbakhiani) is one of the star performers at an elite dance academy in Tbilisi. He’s struggling to provide for his family, but is going steady with his girlfriend Mary (Ana Javakishvili), and seems primed for a spot in Georgia’s touring company, taking their traditional national dance around the world. Then Irakli (Bachi Valishvili) walks in, flashes a smile, and Merab’s professional and personal future suddenly seems far less certain.

The Personal History of David Copperfield – LFF Review

Directed by comedy legend Armando Iannucci, and co-written by frequent collaborator Simon Blackwell, The Personal History of David Copperfield keenly adapts Dickens' famous autobiographical tome into a slim, crowd-pleasing comedy of manners; and although some of the richness of its source material has been lost, the power of its social conscience and humanist themes remains. Cruelly separated... Continue Reading →

Ad Astra – it’s lonely out in space

It’s a boom time for allegorical science fiction movies which frame their galactic journeys as personal quests, a test of emotional endurance as much as physical, where the prize is a long-awaited epiphanic moment for their psychologically constipated heroes.

The Souvenir – Review

In the early 1980s, a young woman from a wealthy background enrols in a prestigious film school in London. Julie (Honor Swinton-Byrne), from a incredibly privileged background, is struggling with her ambition to make a film about an impoverished family in Thatcher's Britain, but finds her cosy life upended when she enters a romantic relationship... Continue Reading →

Pain & Glory – Review

Despite the immaculate dress sense, wild salt-and-pepper hair and a certain similarity in their choice of subject matter, Antonio Banderas isn't portraying movie director Pedro Almodovar here. But as Salvador Mallo, beloved director of Spanish cinema, you'd be forgiven for making the mistake. 

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